Alba-Piedmonte
Alba is town of Piedmont, Italy, in the province of lba is town of Piedmont, Italy, in the province of Cuneo. It is considered the capital of the hilly area of Langhe, and is famous for the white truffle, peach and wine production.

History
Alba's origins date before the Roman civilization, connected probably to the presence of Celt and Ligurian tribes in the area.

The town is on the site of the ancient Alba Pompeia, probably founded by the Roman consul Gnaeus Pompeius Strabo while constructing a road from Aquae Statiellae (Acqui) to Augusta Taurinorum (Turin). Alba was the birthplace of Publius Helvius Pertinax, who was the shortest reigning Roman emperor.

After the fall of the Western Empire, the city was repeatedly sacked by Burgundians, Lombards and Franks. In the 11th century it become a free commune (or city-state) and was a member of the Lombard League. Montferrat and the Visconti fought over the town; later it became a possession of the House of Gonzaga. Charles Emmanuel I of Savoy conquered it twice, while later France and Spain battled for its possession. The Treaty of Cherasco assigned Alba definitively to Savoy.

Alba won a Gold Medal for Military Valour for the heroic activity of its citizens in the Italian resistance movement during the course of World War II. In October 1944 the town was liberated by partisans who established a Republic of Alba which for a few weeks was able to maintain its independence from the Fascist Republic of Salò.

Ecclesiastical History

Diocese of Alba Pompeia
The diocese of Alba Pompeia comprises eighty towns in the civilian province of Cuneo and two in the province of Alexandria. Heading the list of the bishops of Alba is a St. Dionysius, of whom we are told that after serving there for some years he became Archbishop of Milan. He was the Dionysius who so energetically opposed Arianism and was exiled in the year 355 by the Emperor Constans. Papebroch (Acta SS., VI, 40) disputes the reliability of this tradition, since a bishop of that period was forbidden to leave his diocese for another. A list of nine early bishops of Alba, from another St. Dionysius (380) down to a Bishop Julius (553), was compiled from sepulchral inscriptions found in the cathedral of alba towards the end of the fifteenth century by Dalmazzo Berendenco, an antiquarian. De Rossi, however, on examination proved it a forgery (Boll. di Arch. Crist., 1868, 45-47).

The first bishop of Alba of whose existence we are certain is Lampradius who was present at the synod held in Rome in 499 under Pope Symmachus (Mansi, VIII, 235, Mon. Germ. Hist., Auct. Antiq. XII, 400.) In the series of bishops, Benzo is notable as an adversary of Gregory VII and a partisan of the Empire in the struggle of the Investitures. (Orsi, "Un libellista del sec. XI", in "Rivista storica Italiana", 1884, p. 427.)

The diocese had in the early 20th century 101 parishes; 276 secular priests; 11 regulars; 403 churches and chapels; 10 seminaries.. It is considered the capital of the hilly area of Langhe, and is famous for the white truffle, peach and wine production.