Corniglia-Cinque Terre
Liguria

The Cinque Terre are five coastal villages in the province of La Spezia in the Liguria region of Italy.

"Discovered" by foreigners, namely rich English travelers, in the early 20th century, they have come to be among the most popular areas of Italy among tourists.

The coastline, the five villages, and the surrounding hillsides are all encapsulated in a national park by the same name.

The Cinque Terre is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The five villages are, from west to east (i.e., from Genoa towards La Spezia):

Monterosso al Mare
Vernazza
Corniglia
Manarola
Riomaggiore

Corniglia is a frazione ("fraction") of the commune of Vernazza in the province of La Spezia, Liguria, northern Italy. Unlike the other localities of the Cinque Terre, Corniglia is not directly next to the sea. Instead, it is on the top of a promontory about 100 meters high, surrounded on three sides by vineyards and terraces and the fourth side descends steeply on the sea. To reach Corniglia, it is necessary to climb the Lardarina, a long brick flight of steps composed of 33 flights with 377 steps or, otherwise follow a vehicular road that, from the station, leads to the village.

The Cinque Terre are five coastal villages in the province of La Spezia in the Liguria region of Italy.

The village stretches along the main road, Fieschi Road, and the houses have one side facing this road and the other facing the sea. Corniglia is characterized by narrow roads and a terrace obtained in the rock from which all other four Cinque Terre's villages, two on one side and two on the other, can be seen. The town planning structure presents also original characteristics compared to those of the other villages: the houses are lower set, and only more recently higher, similar to those of the villages of the hinterland.

Corniglia is mentioned in a famous novella of Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron.